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M497
Conventional Machining Technology

Jurandir Primo, PE

Machining is a part of the manufacture of many metal products, but it can also be used on materials such as wood, plastic, ceramic, and composites. Since the advent of new technologies such as, CNC center machines, electrical discharge machining, electrochemical machining, electron beam machining, photochemical machining, ultrasonic machining, etc., the conventional machining is used to differentiate from these modern technologies.

Most beginners tend to be a little intimidated when they see a machine tool in operation for the first time. As you go along in this course, you will find that machine tools are very friendly, logical and easy to understand with proper instructions. Machining can be a business, a hobby, or both. The modern machining nowadays is carried out by Computer Numerical Control (CNC), in which computers are used to control the movement and operation of the cutting machines.

Machine tools filled a need created by textile machinery during the Industrial Revolution in England after 1700. Until that time the machinery was made mostly from wood, including gearing and shafts. The increase in mechanization required more metal parts, usually made of cast iron or wrought iron. Room temperature wrought iron was worked with a file and chisels and could be transformed into gears and other complex parts; however, hand working lacked precision and was a slow and expensive process.

According to history, the advance in the accuracy of machine tools can be traced to Henry Maudslay when he established the manufacture and use of master plane gages in his work shop. With the accuracy creation of master plane gages, all critical components of machine tools could then be developed to the desired improvement. The first machine tools offered commercially available were constructed by Matthew Murray in England around 1800.

The demand for machine tools and the human desire for firearms and artillery started the need for all type of machine tools. Lathes and boring machines for boring cannon barrels led the way. Soon after World War II, the numerical control (NC) machine was developed. After 1970, computers, new tools and materials were added to give even more flexibility to all types of machine tools and operations.

This course includes a multiple-choice quiz at the end, which is designed to enhance the understanding of the course materials.


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NY PE & PLS: You must choose courses that are technical in nature or related to matters of laws and ethics contributing to the health and welfare of the public. NY Board does not accept courses related to office management, risk management, leadership, marketing, accounting, financial planning, real estate, and basic CAD. Specific course topics that are on the borderline and are not acceptable by the NY Board have been noted under the course description on our website.

AIA Members: You must take the courses listed under the category "AIA/CES Registered Courses" if you want us to report your Learning Units (LUs) to AIA/CES. If you take courses not registered with AIA/CES, you need to report the earned Learning Units (not qualified for HSW credits) using Self Report Form provided by AIA/CES.

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