Print this page Print this page

Concrete Deterioration AIA HSW

Matthew Stuart, P.E., S.E., F.ASCE

This program is registered with the AIA/CES for continuing professional education. As such, it does not include content that may be deemed or construed to be an approval or endorsement by the AIA of any material of construction or any method or manner of handling, using, distributing, or dealing in any material or product. Questions related to specific materials, methods, and services will be addressed at the conclusion of this presentation.


PDH Online | PDH Center


5272 Meadow Estates Drive
Fairfax, VA 22030-6658

Phone & Fax: 703-988-0088
www.PDHonline.com
www.PDHcenter.com

An AIA/CES Registered Continuing Education Provider (#J681)


 

Course Outline

Reinforced concrete is a very versatile and durable building material. Reinforced concrete efficiently combines the best properties of concrete and reinforcing steel into a strong structural element. In addition, the high alkalinity of concrete helps to protect the embedded steel from corrosion. However, due to the porosity of concrete, its use in exterior environments and tendency to be exposed to deleterious chemicals, this material can easily be subjected to deterioration.

Deterioration of concrete can take the form of corrosion of the internal reinforcing or degradation of the exposed surface of the material. Cracks increase the likely hood of the deterioration of concrete in most environments. Concrete can also become deteriorated via freeze/thaw cycles, internal aggregate reactions and heat.

Visual and destructive methods of investigation should be employed when determining the cause of concrete deterioration. The results of the physical observations and material tests associated with a proper investigation should be used to establish the best methods of repair and prevention of further deterioration.

This course includes a true-false quiz at the end, which is designed to enhance the understanding of the course materials.

Learning Objective

At the conclusion of this course, the student will:

Course Introduction

Before designing a new concrete structure or as a part of the investigation of an existing concrete structure it is helpful to have a basic understanding of the properties and susceptibilities of the material that can either prevent or promote deterioration. The following discussion will provide the user with a basic understanding of the conditions in which a concrete structure is most likely to exhibit deterioration and the cause of the degradation.

Course Content

The course content is contained in the following PDF file:

Concrete Deterioration

Please click on the above underlined hypertext to view, download or print the document for your study. Because of the large file size, we recommend that you first save the file to your computer by right clicking the mouse and choosing "Save Target As ...", and then open the file in Adobe Acrobat Reader. If you still experience any difficulty in downloading or opening this file, you may need to close some applications or reboot your computer to free up some memory.

Course Summary

Reinforced concrete is a very versatile and durable building material. Hardened concrete has very good compressive strength, but very poor tensile strength. Steel on the other hand has both very good tensile strength and thermal properties that are compatible with concrete. Concrete is also highly alkaline. This property provides an environment that limits the corrosion of any embedded steel and helps to assure the durability of the reinforced concrete member. The complementary properties of concrete and steel are combined to provide reinforced concrete structures that are capable of supporting considerable loads.

Due to the porosity of concrete, its use in exterior environments and tendency to be exposed to deleterious chemicals, reinforced concrete can easily be subjected to deterioration. Sources of deterioration include corrosion of the reinforcing steel and degradation of the exposed concrete surface due to chemical attack. Concrete deterioration can also occur as a result of freeze/thaw cycles, internal aggregate reactions and exposure to extreme heat. The presence of cracks both promotes and helps accelerate deterioration of concrete.

Visual and destructive methods of investigation should be employed when determining the cause of concrete deterioration. The results of the physical observations and material tests associated with a proper investigation should be used to establish the best methods of repair and prevention of further deterioration.


Related Links

For additional information related to this subject, please visit the following websites or web pages:

The International Concrete Repair Institute

STRUCTURAL

Quiz

Once you finish studying the above course content, you need to take a quiz to obtain the PDH credits.

Take a Quiz


DISCLAIMER: The materials contained in the online course are not intended as a representation or warranty on the part of PDH Center or any other person/organization named herein. The materials are for general information only. They are not a substitute for competent professional advice. Application of this information to a specific project should be reviewed by a registered architect and/or professional engineer/surveyor. Anyone making use of the information set forth herein does so at their own risk and assumes any and all resulting liability arising therefrom.